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Original research
FSIP2 plays a role in the acrosome development during spermiogenesis
  1. Rui Zheng1,
  2. Yan Wang2,
  3. Yaqian Li1,
  4. Juncen Guo1,
  5. Yuting Wen1,
  6. Chuan Jiang1,
  7. Yihong Yang2,
  8. Ying Shen1
  1. 1Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, Key Laboratory of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Pediatric Diseases and Birth Defects of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China
  2. 2Reproduction Medical Center of West China Second University Hospital, Key Laboratory of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Pediatric Diseases and Birth Defects of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China
  1. Correspondence to Dr Ying Shen, Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, Key Laboratory of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Pediatric Diseases and Birth Defects of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University West China Second University Hospital, Chengdu, China; yingcaishen01{at}163.com

Abstract

Background Loss-of-function mutations in FSIP2 result in multiple morphological abnormalities of the flagella in humans and mice. Intriguingly, a recent study found that FSIP2 might regulate the expression of acrosomal proteins, indicating that Fsip2 might be involved in acrosome development in mice. However, whether FSIP2 also function in acrosome biogenesis in humans is largely unknown, and the underlying mechanism of which is unexplored.

Objective Our objective was to reveal potential function of FSIP2 in regulating sperm acrosome formation.

Methods We performed whole exome sequencing on four asthenoteratozoospermic patients. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were conducted to assess the protein expression of FSIP2. Proteomics approach, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation were implemented to clarify the molecules in acrosome biogenesis regulated by FSIP2.

Results Biallelic FSIP2 variants were identified in four asthenoteratozoospermic individuals. The protein expression of MUT-FSIP2 was sharply decreased or absent in vitro or in vivo. Interestingly, aside from the sperm flagellar defects, the acrosomal hypoplasia was detected in numerous sperm from the four patients. FSIP2 co-localised with peanut agglutinin in the acrosome during spermatogenesis. Moreover, FSIP2 interacted with proteins (DPY19L2, SPACA1, HSP90B1, KIAA1210, HSPA2 and CLTC) involved in acrosome biogenesis. In addition, spermatozoa from patients carrying FSIP2 mutations showed downregulated expression of DPY19L2, ZPBP, SPACA1, CCDC62, CCIN, SPINK2 and CSNK2A2.

Conclusion Our findings unveil that FSIP2 might involve in sperm acrosome development, and consequently, its mutations might contribute to globozoospermia or acrosomal aplasia. We meanwhile first uncover the potential molecular mechanism of FSIP2 regulating acrosome biogenesis.

  • reproductive medicine
  • molecular Biology
  • genetics

Data availability statement

Data are available on reasonable request.

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Data availability statement

Data are available on reasonable request.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors As guarantor, YS designed and supervised the study. YY and YWa collected clinical data. RZ, JG, YL, YWe and CJ performed the experiments. YS and YWa provided funding support and analysed data. YWa and JG interpreted the data. RZ wrote the manuscript. YS revised the manuscript.

  • Funding This work was supported by the West China Second University Hospital of Sichuan University (No. KS369) and Chengdu Puhua Medical Technology (21H1210).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.