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Evidence for linkage and association of the markers near the LPL gene with hypertension in Chinese families
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  1. W J Yang1,2,
  2. J F Huang1,
  3. C L Yao4,
  4. Z J Fan5,
  5. D L Ge1,
  6. W Q Gan1,
  7. G Y Huang1,
  8. R T Hui3,
  9. Y Shen2,
  10. B Q Qiang2,
  11. D F Gu1,2
  1. 1Division of Population Genetics, Cardiovascular Institute and Fu Wai Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 167 Beilishi Road, Beijing 100037, China
  2. 2National Human Genome Centre at Beijing, North Yongchang Rd 3–707, Beijing 100176, China
  3. 3Sino-German Molecular Medicine Laboratory, Cardiovascular Institute, Fu Wai Hospital, Beijing, China
  4. 4Nanjing Medical University School of Public Health, China
  5. 5Peking Union Hospital, Beijing, China
  1. Correspondence to:
 Dr D F Gu, Division of Population Genetics, Cardiovascular Institute, Fu Wai Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 167 Beilishi Road, Beijing 100037, China; 
 gudf{at}yahoo.com

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Essential hypertension (EH) is the most common risk factor for cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renal diseases. It is a complex trait that is heritable and involves multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL) and environmental conditions affecting the underlying physiological mechanisms.1 Genetic linkage studies and genome wide scans have disclosed many possible candidate loci contributing to hypertension.

Hypertension has been found to occur more often than expected in families with familial hyperlipidaemia. Because dyslipidaemia is a common finding in hypertensive patients, the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene is a logical candidate gene that could contribute to the development of hypertension.2 LPL is a crucial enzyme in plasma lipoprotein metabolism, which hydrolyses triglycerides and chylomicrons. Two genetic linkage studies of hypertension in Taiwan suggested some positive linkage signals in or near the LPL gene region with blood pressure (BP).3,4 Because most Taiwanese have consanguinity with Chinese Han people, it is feasible and rational to verify these results in another homogeneous group.

Adducin is a membrane skeletal protein that is involved in the regulation of cellular signal transduction and membrane ion transport. Hypertension has also been linked to the α-adducin (ADD1) gene in some human studies.5–7

Key points

  • Essential hypertension (EH) is a common, late onset disease that exhibits complex genetic heterogeneity, and is also the most common risk factor for cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renal diseases.

  • The aim of this study was to examine whether seven microsatellite markers at four candidate genes (lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene, α-adducin (ADD1) gene, angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) gene, and vasopressin receptor 1A (VAPR1A) gene) or their flanking genome regions were linked or associated with EH in 148 Chinese hypertensive families.

  • Using the linkage model in SOLAR, we identified a region of linkage with systolic blood pressure (SBP) to a 10.6 cM interval …

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