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Original article
Rare, protein-truncating variants in ATM, CHEK2 and PALB2, but not XRCC2, are associated with increased breast cancer risks

Authors

  • Brennan Decker Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UKCancer Genetics and Comparative Genomics Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Jamie Allen Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Craig Luccarini Department of Oncology, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Karen A Pooley Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Mitul Shah Department of Oncology, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Manjeet K Bolla Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Qin Wang Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Shahana Ahmed Department of Oncology, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Caroline Baynes Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Don M Conroy Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Judith Brown Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Robert Luben Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Elaine A Ostrander Cancer Genetics and Comparative Genomics Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Paul DP Pharoah Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UKDepartment of Oncology, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Alison M Dunning Department of Oncology, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Douglas F Easton Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UKDepartment of Oncology, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  1. Correspondence to Professor Douglas F Easton, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; dfe20{at}medschl.cam.ac.uk
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Citation

Decker B, Allen J, Luccarini C, et al
Rare, protein-truncating variants in ATM, CHEK2 and PALB2, but not XRCC2, are associated with increased breast cancer risks

Publication history

  • Received 9 February 2017
  • Revised 9 May 2017
  • Accepted 22 May 2017
  • Published online 4 August 2017.

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