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Risk assessment of maternally inherited SDHD paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma
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  • Published on:
    Response

    We thank our colleagues for their interest in our study recently published in the Journal of Medical Genetics entitled ‘Risk assessment of maternally inherited SDHD paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma’.
    In response, we would like to underline that our study is a prospective study (see 'Methods' section) and not a case study.
    Today, the French national registry for hereditary paraganglioma (PGL.R) contains 193 SDHD different families carrying more than 60 different mutations, which is different from the Dutch situation where 87.1% of the SDHD-mutation carriers have the same founder Dutch mutation p.Asp92Tyr [1]. As explained in our paper, we have launched this prospective study because of the few cases of SDHD-tumors inherited via the maternal line reported in the literature, but also because we were aware of three other putative cases among patients suffering from paraganglioma or pheochromocytoma (PPGL) registered in PGL.R. Unfortunately, for those three cases we were not able to collect tumor tissues to definitely prove the role of the maternally inherited SDHD mutation in the tumorigenesis. The identification of a new case, a young asymptomatic woman, by our prospective study was nevertheless a surprise for us. So we strongly suggest our colleagues to take advantage from their large cohort of 600 at-risk subjects to perform the same prospective study in asymptomatic subjects, although most of them would carry the same SDHD founder mutation, to confi...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Should we screen carriers of maternally inherited SDHD mutations?
    • Jean-Pierre Bayley
    • Other Contributors:
      • Jeroen C Jansen, Eleonora P M Corssmit, Frederik J Hes

    Dear Editor,

    We are writing to comment on a recent paper published in your journal by Burnichon and colleagues: Burnichon N, et al. Risk assessment of maternally inherited SDHD paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma. J Med Genet. 2017; 54:125-133.

    In this paper a case study is presented describing development of pheochromocytoma in a carrier of an SDHD mutation. Although at first sight not an uncommon occu...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.