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J Med Genet 42:577-582 doi:10.1136/jmg.2004.028712
  • Short report

A new locus for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT3) maps to chromosome 5

  1. S G Cole1,
  2. M E Begbie2,
  3. G M F Wallace3,
  4. C L Shovlin1
  1. 1The Eric Bywaters Centre, Respiratory Section, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London W12 ONN, UK
  2. 2Respiratory Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London W12 ONN, UK
  3. 3Respiratory Medicine Unit, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
  1. Correspondence to:
 Dr Claire Shovlin
 The Eric Bywaters Centre, Respiratory Section, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN, UK; c.shovlinimperial.ac.uk
  • Received 1 November 2004
  • Accepted 15 December 2004
  • Revised 14 December 2004

Abstract

Patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, or Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome) have variable presentation patterns and a high risk of preventable complications. Diagnostic tests for mutations in endoglin (HHT type 1) and ALK-1 (HHT type 2) are available. Some HHT patients are now known to have HHT-juvenile polyposis overlap syndrome due to Smad4 mutations. Families were ascertained following the presentation of probands for embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. Genome-wide linkage studies using over 700 polymorphic markers, and sequencing of candidate genes, were performed. In a previously described HHT family unlinked to endoglin or ALK-1, linkage to Smad4 was excluded, and no mutations were identified in the endoglin, ALK-1, or Smad4 genes. Two point LOD scores and recombination mapping identified a 5.4 cM HHT3 disease gene interval on chromosome 5 in which a single haplotype was inherited by all affected members of the pedigree. The remainder of the genome was excluded to a 2–5 cM resolution. We are currently studying a further family potentially linked to HHT3. We conclude that classical HHT with pulmonary involvement can result from mutations in an unidentified gene on chromosome 5. Identification of HHT3 should further illuminate HHT pathogenic mechanisms in which aberrant transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signalling is implicated.

Footnotes

  • This project was primarily funded by the British Heart Foundation, with additional support from the Margaret Hayton HHT Memorial Fund.

  • Competing interests: none declared